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The Social Mind and Body group (SOMBY), led by Natalie Sebanz and Günther Knoblich, investigates the perceptual, cognitive, and motor processes that underlie social cognition and social interaction. Our take is that individual minds are geared towards understanding others and interacting with others. This is why we study perception, cognition, and action in social context. As a tribute to good old solitary thinking we also study the processes underlying insight in problem solving.

Joint planning, coordination, and commitment

Communication and teaching in joint action

Joint attention, perspective taking, and mindreading

Self and other in perception and action

Insight and innovation
 

Funding

2015-2021 ERC Synergy grant Constructing social minds: Coordination, communication, and cultural transmission (SOMICS) led by Günther Knoblich

2016-2021 ERC Starting Grant The Sense of Commitment: An Integrative Framework for Modeling the Sense of Commitment (SENSE OF COMMITMENT) led by John Michael
 

News

May 7, 2021

The Somby Lab in Budapest will reopen next week and a limited number of timeslots will be available for our studies soon. Stay tuned!

March 2, 2021

The Somby lab in Budapest will be closed on 3rd of March due to the increasing number of Covid-19 cases in Hungary. We will reopen as soon as the situation improves.

January 5, 2021

We are happy to announce that our lab reopened on the 4th of January. A strict hygiene protcol has been established to ensure the safety of our researchers and participants. If you are interested in participating in the new studies, please check Sona for the available timeslots. https://ceuparticipate.sona-systems.com/

December 7, 2020
We are happy to announce that the Somby lab in Vienna has been reopened today. New timeslots have been added to the Finger drumming and the Piano listening studies. We are looking forward to seeing you!
December 1, 2020

We are happy to share that the NY Times has interviewed Prof. Natalie Sebanz about the findings of one of our studies. Click here to read the interview and learn more about how to get in sync with someone.

The interview was based on this publication: