Joint Music-Making

in press
 
Zamm, A., Debener, S., Konvalinka, I., Sebanz, N., Knoblich, G. (in press). The Sound of Silence: An EEG study of how musicians time pauses in individual and joint music performance.  Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience.
 
2020
 
Wolf, T., Sebanz, N., & Knoblich, G. (2020). Adaptation to unstable coordination patterns in individual and joint actions. PLOS ONE15(5), e0232667. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0232667
 
2019
 
Wolf, T., Vesper, C., Sebanz, N., Keller, P. E., & Knoblich, G. (2019). Combining Phase Advancement and Period Correction Explains Rushing during Joint Rhythmic Activities. Scientific Reports, 9(1), 9350. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-45601-5 
 
2018 
 
McEllin, L., Knoblich, G., & Sebanz, N. (2018). Distinct kinematic markers of demonstration and joint action coordination? Evidence from virtual xylophone playing. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 44(6), 885-897.
 
 
2017
 
Michael, J. (2017). Music Performance as Joint Action. In The Routledge Companion to Embodied Music Interaction (pp. 160-166). Routledge.
  
Novembre, G., Knoblich, G., Dunne, L., & Keller, P. E. (2017). Interpersonal synchrony enhanced through 20 Hz phase-coupled dual brain stimulation. Social cognitive and affective neuroscience12(4), 662-670.
 
2016
 
Loehr, J. & Vesper, C. (2016). The sound of you and me: Novices represent shared goals in joint action. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69, 535-547
  
2013
 
Loehr, J.D., Kourtis, D., Vesper, C., Sebanz, N., & Knoblich, G. (2013). Monitoring individual and joint action outcomes in duet music performance. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 25, 1049-1061.
 
2009
 
Knoblich, G., & Repp, B. (2009). Inferring agency from sound. Cognition, 111, 48-262.
 
Repp, B., & Knoblich, G. (2009). Performed or observed keyboard actions affect pianists' judgments of relative pitchQuarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 62, 2156-2170.
 
2007
  
Keller, Knoblich, & Repp (2007). Pianists duet better when they play with themselves. Consciousness and Cognition, 16, 102-111.