Papers

Collective benefit in joint perceptual judgments: Partial roles of shared environments, meta-cognition, and feedback

Our study shows that people can combine their observations to make better decisions without verbally communicating their confidence to each other.

Combining phase Advancement and period Correction explains Rushing during Joint Rhythmic Activities

When people engage in rhythmic joint actions, from simple clapping games to elaborate joint music making, they tend to increase their tempo without being aware of it consciously.

Reciprocal information flow and role distribution support joint action coordination

Our new study shows that in a complex task interacting with each other can lead to successful joint performance both with and without role distribution.

Co-actors represent the order of each other’s actions

The present findings extend previous research on co-representation, providing evidence that people represent not only the elements of another’s task, but also their temporal structure.

The Sense of Commitment in Individuals With Borderline Personality Traits in a Non-clinical Population

High levels of borderline personality disorder traits may give rise to a difficulty in adapting one's social expectations and behavior in light of interpersonal commitments.

Joint action coordination in expert-novice pairs: Can experts predictnovices’suboptimal timing?

How do joint action partners with different skill levels achieve coordination? Can experts predict the suboptimal timing of novices? What kind of information allows them to predict novices’ timing?

Modulating Action Duration to Establish Nonconventional Communication

Actors spontaneously adjust the duration of their actions to communicate task-relevant information

Making good cider out of bad apples: Signaling expectations boosts cooperation among would-be free riders

This study investigates how group-cooperation heuristics boosts voluntary contributions to public goods, in particular from individuals who otherwise prefer to free-ride.

Prioritization of arbitrary faces associated to self: An EEG study

Our results indicate that even unfamiliar faces that are associated to self can activate a self-representation. Once the self-representation has been activated the processing of ensuing stimuli is facilitated, irrespective of whether they are associated with the self.